532 Appeals Involving State Agencies in 2017

In 2017, the Department of Corrections was involved in 23.3% of Right-to-Know Law appeals filed against state agencies.

Here’s the complete list:

  • Department of Corrections, 23.3%
  • State Police, 13.7%
  • Department of Environmental Protection, 8.3%
  • Department of State, 7.0%
  • Department of Transportation, 6.2%
  • Department of Health, 5.5%
  • Board of Probation and Parole, 5.1%
  • Department of Human Services, 2.6%
  • Department of Education, 2.1%
  • Department of Labor and Industry, 1.9%
  • Other, 24.4%

This information is from the OOR’s 2017 Annual Report.

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1,782 Appeals Involving Local Agencies in 2017

In 2017, municipal governments (cities, boroughs, and townships) were involved in 43.1% of Right-to-Know Law appeals filed against local agencies.

Here’s the complete list:

  • Local Education Agencies, 23.0%
  • Townships, 20.7%
  • Counties, 18.7%
  • Cities, 11.3%
  • Boroughs, 11.1%
  • Police Departments, 6.2%
  • Authorities, 5.1%
  • Fire Departments, 0.8%
  • Other, 3.0%

This information is from the OOR’s 2017 Annual Report.

2,434 Appeals Filed in 2017

2017 was the third-busiest year ever for the Office of Open Records in terms of the number of Right-to-Know Law appeals filed. In addition, the appeals continued to grow in complexity, with more sophisticated arguments being made and more nuanced issues being presented in many cases.

Nearly two-thirds (63.5%) of all appeals filed in 2017 were filed by everyday citizens. They were followed by:

  • Inmates, 18.4%
  • Companies, 10.1%
  • Media, 6.3%
  • Government officials, 1.6%

This information is from the OOR’s 2017 Annual Report.

29,746 Pageviews per Month

We’re putting the final touches on the Office of Open Records’ 2017 Annual Report (the full report should be out this week). In the meantime, here’s one statistic that didn’t make the final cut but which may be of some interest.

In 2017, the OOR’s website generated 356,947 pageviews — an average of 29,746 per month.

March was the month with the most pageviews, 33,706.

The five most visited pages were:

New Searchable AORO Database

Last week, the Office of Open Records (“OOR”) launched a searchable online database of Agency Open Records Officer (“AORO”) contact information for every registered agency in the Commonwealth.

The AORO database allows the public to contact the correct AORO to request agency records and ensures that the OOR can contact AOROs in the event an appeal is filed with the OOR.

You can find the database here: http://www.openrecords.pa.gov/RTKL/AOROSearch.cfm

LBFC Report: Recommendations

Open records_logo stackedThe report released today by the Legislative Budget and Finance Committee entitled “Costs to Implement the Right-to-Know Law” includes eight recommendations, four for the General Assembly and four for the OOR.

I support all eight recommendations (one, as noted below, with some reservations). In more detail:

LBFC Recommendations for the General Assembly

Recommendation: Require agencies to provide AORO contact information to include name, telephone number, email address, and physical address to the OOR annually or whenever there is a change in the information.

Response: The OOR currently collects this information on a very informal basis. However, a statutory mandate for agencies to provide AORO contact information to the OOR, combined with technological improvements already in development (i.e., an online AORO database), would allow us to proceed in a far more efficient manner.

Recommendation: Require agencies to prominently post required RTKL information on their websites and specifically define AORO contact information to include the name, telephone number, email address, and physical address of the AORO.

Response: Like LBFC, the OOR has found that it can sometimes be difficult or impossible to locate AORO information on an agency website. In addition to supporting a new statutory requirement that the information be “prominently” posted, the OOR will continue to emphasize this as a best practice in our training.

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LBFC Report: Highlights

Open records_logo stackedHere are highlights from the report released today by the Legislative Budget and Finance Committee entitled “Costs to Implement the Right-to-Know Law.”

The report found that “most of Pennsylvania’s state and local government agencies receive few RTKL requests, most of the requests are easily fulfilled at a relatively low cost, and only a small percentage of the requests are appealed.”

Annual Costs to Agencies

  • Almost 54 percent of agencies reported an annual cost of $500 or less to comply with the Right-to-Know Law (RTKL).
  • About 92 percent of agencies reported an annual cost of $10,000 or less.
  • The total cost of responding to RTKL requests by all agencies in 2016 is estimated at $5.7 million to $9.7 million. With more than 6,000 agencies across the state, that’s an average cost of just $950 to $1,617 per agency.

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